The general practice rotation: Level of student involvement, occurrence of teaching points, and questions asked by preceptors

“Purpose of dissertation: A general practice and family medicine rotation is mandatory as part of undergraduate medical education in Germany. The interaction between general practitioners and medical students has until now seldom been the focus of research. The purpose of this dissertation was...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Duncan, Gertrude Florence
Contributors: Bösner, Stefan (Prof. Dr.) (Thesis advisor)
Format: Dissertation
Language:English
Published: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2020
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Summary:“Purpose of dissertation: A general practice and family medicine rotation is mandatory as part of undergraduate medical education in Germany. The interaction between general practitioners and medical students has until now seldom been the focus of research. The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the occurrence and content of teaching points and the level of student involvement in the consultation process. Additionally, questions asked and tasks set by preceptors were categorized according to Anderson and Krathwohl et al ´s revision of Bloom´s taxonomy. All participants provided informed, written consent. Data were collected by two observers using field note forms and videotaping. This was followed by quantitative and qualitative analyses. Results: From April to December 2012, 410 patient consultations were observed. Twelve medical surgeries were involved, including 16 general practitioners and 13 medical students. Teaching points occurred in 66.3% of observed consultations. Most teaching points (74.3%) contained general information, whilst 46.3% of teaching points contained specific, case related information. The topic most frequently covered was therapy (disease management) (48.5%), whilst case presentation was a topic in only 0.4% of consultations containing teaching points. Multiple categorizations were possible. Student involvement was most commonly passive (78.3% of all consultations), followed by allocation of single tasks or demonstration of findings by the preceptor in 50.7% of all consultations. Some form of student consultation occurred in 32.2% of observed cases. Student consultation under direct supervision occurred in 5.9% of observed cases. Multiple categorizations were possible. Questions asked and tasks set by teaching practitioners were categorized according to Anderson and Krathwohl et al ´s revision of Bloom´s taxonomy. Twenty-two videotaped consultations containing altogether 57 categorizable events were transcribed and analyzed. There was a concentration of events in the conceptual knowledge (18 events) and procedural knowledge (36 events) dimensions. The metacognitive knowledge dimension registered no events at all. Multiple categorizations were possible. Discussion: Preceptors regularly imparted knowledge in the form of teaching points; however, students were most commonly passive observers of the consultation process. When questions were asked, they usually aimed for conceptual or procedural knowledge. Teaching practitioners therefore appeared to make an effort to transport knowledge to their future colleagues. Assuming that supervised active student participation in patient care has a higher educational value, these findings suggest the need for creating greater awareness for this issue. It is possible conceptual and procedural knowledge dimensions were frequently aimed for as they were easier to verify or supervise. In contrast, metacognition is perhaps harder to convey. The results may be affected by selection bias, as study participation was voluntary and observation visible. Thus, the participants may have possessed characteristics which influenced the interaction. Behaviour deemed desirable may have been demonstrated. Conclusions: The results presented here provide unique and detailed insights into the student-teacher interaction occurring during the general practice rotation. The results may be viewed as a starting point for further faculty development sessions and research in order to create awareness for different aspects of teaching and learning” ("Summary" aus der Dissertation „The general practice rotation: Level of student involvement, occurrence of teaching points, and questions asked by preceptors.” Gertrude Florence Duncan 2020).
Physical Description:180 Pages
DOI:https://doi.org/10.17192/z2020.0202