Feedback seeking as an active, goal-oriented behavior – a psychological reframing of energy consumption feedback

In the last decade the upcoming of the new digital metering technology combined with communication and information technologies caused a new wave of research on feedback and energy efficiency. In difference to earlier feedback studies, several field trials with sample sizes of several hundred up to...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Gölz, Sebastian
Contributors: Homburg, Andreas (Prof.) (Thesis advisor)
Format: Dissertation
Language:English
Published: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2015
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Summary:In the last decade the upcoming of the new digital metering technology combined with communication and information technologies caused a new wave of research on feedback and energy efficiency. In difference to earlier feedback studies, several field trials with sample sizes of several hundred up to thousands of households have been initiated in the European context in parallel. High expectations have been sowed from reviews on existing feedback research. Rather surprisingly the results in energy savings caused by feedback systems incorporating smart metering technology turned out to drag behind the high expectations. This doctoral thesis intends to line out an existing blind spot within the energy feedback research by highlighting the notion of an active recipient pursuing own goals and develop own strategies what to do with feedback. Findings and modelling from feedback research of organizational and social psychology is transferred to energy feedback research and forms the framework of a series of studies analysing empirical data from two large one-years-trials with feedback based on smart metering technologies. Major attention is given to the general concepts introduced in the theoretical frameworks: 1) Do individuals set goals for feedback use? If they do so, how are they are linked with each other – is there empirical evidence for multiple goal profiles? 2) Are the different goals determining the feedback seeking behavior? 3) Is there any empirical evidence that individuals proactively seek feedback information in a web-based feedback system? Do goals for feedback use have any predictive power for the feedback seeking behavior? 4) What is the effect on consumption, if different feedback seeking behaviours are identified, what conclusions in relation to the theoretical framework can be made?
Physical Description:118 Pages
DOI:https://doi.org/10.17192/z2016.0215