Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor for rapid detection of Salmonella and Salmonella infections

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors enable rapid and label free sensing of biomolecular interactions. Immobilising specific biorecognition elements on the surface of a gold-coated prism to capture specific analytes in the liquid phase forms the basis of SPR-based biosensors. The liquid phase...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Datta Mazumdar, Saikat
Contributors: Keusgen, Michael (Prof. Dr.) (Thesis advisor)
Format: Dissertation
Language:English
Published: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2008
Pharmazeutische Chemie
Subjects:
SPR
Online Access:PDF Full Text
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Summary:Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors enable rapid and label free sensing of biomolecular interactions. Immobilising specific biorecognition elements on the surface of a gold-coated prism to capture specific analytes in the liquid phase forms the basis of SPR-based biosensors. The liquid phase is in contact with the gold surface. Binding events occurring between the analyte and the biorecognition element results in change of refractive index of the liquid phase. The change in refractive index is proportional to the concentration of the analyte binding to the surface. The SPR response in turn is directly correlated to the change in refractive index. This property of SPR has been successfully exploited to monitor binding interactions of different interacting chemical and biological components. SPR based biosensors have found valuable applications in the area of health, environment and food safety. The phenomenon of SPR has been used in this work to obtain a biosensor which can: (a) detect the pathogenic bacteria Salmonella in complex food matrices such as milk, (b) distinguish between multiple serovars of Salmonella when present together in milk, (c) assign serogroups and serotypes to isolated Salmonella strains, and (d) also detect Salmonella infections in farm animals and humans. The Plasmonic® SPR device was used for this work.
DOI:https://doi.org/10.17192/z2008.0668