Virtual Machine Image Management for Elastic Resource Usage in Grid Computing

Grid Computing has evolved from an academic concept to a powerful paradigm in the area of high performance computing (HPC). Over the last few years, powerful Grid computing solutions were developed that allow the execution of computational tasks on distributed computing resources. Grid computing has...

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Bibliographische Detailangaben
1. Verfasser: Fallenbeck, Niels
Beteiligte: Freisleben, Bernd (Prof. Dr.) (BetreuerIn (Doktorarbeit))
Format: Dissertation
Sprache:Englisch
Veröffentlicht: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2011
Mathematik und Informatik
Schlagworte:
VM
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Zusammenfassung:Grid Computing has evolved from an academic concept to a powerful paradigm in the area of high performance computing (HPC). Over the last few years, powerful Grid computing solutions were developed that allow the execution of computational tasks on distributed computing resources. Grid computing has recently attracted many commercial customers. To enable commercial customers to be able to execute sensitive data in the Grid, strong security mechanisms must be put in place to secure the customers' data. In contrast, the development of Cloud Computing, which entered the scene in 2006, was driven by industry: it was designed with respect to security from the beginning. Virtualization technology is used to separate the users e.g., by putting the different users of a system inside a virtual machine, which prevents them from accessing other users' data. The use of virtualization in the context of Grid computing has been examined early and was found to be a promising approach to counter the security threats that have appeared with commercial customers. One main part of the work presented in this thesis is the Image Creation Station (ICS), a component which allows users to administer their virtual execution environments (virtual machines) themselves and which is responsible for managing and distributing the virtual machines in the entire system. In contrast to Cloud computing, which was designed to allow even inexperienced users to execute their computational tasks in the Cloud easily, Grid computing is much more complex to use. The ICS makes it easier to use the Grid by overcoming traditional limitations like installing needed software on the compute nodes that users use to execute the computational tasks. This allows users to bring commercial software to the Grid for the first time, without the need for local administrators to install the software to computing nodes that are accessible by all users. Moreover, the administrative burden is shifted from the local Grid site's administrator to the users or experienced software providers that allow the provision of individually tailored virtual machines to each user. But the ICS is not only responsible for enabling users to manage their virtual machines themselves, it also ensures that the virtual machines are available on every site that is part of the distributed Grid system. A second aspect of the presented solution focuses on the elasticity of the system by automatically acquiring free external resources depending on the system's current workload. In contrast to existing systems, the presented approach allows the system's administrator to add or remove resource sets during runtime without needing to restart the entire system. Moreover, the presented solution allows users to not only use existing Grid resources but allows them to scale out to Cloud resources and use these resources on-demand. By ensuring that unused resources are shut down as soon as possible, the computational costs of a given task are minimized. In addition, the presented solution allows each user to specify which resources can be used to execute a particular job. This is useful when a job processes sensitive data e.g., that is not allowed to leave the company. To obtain a comparable function in today's systems, a user must submit her computational task to a particular resource set, losing the ability to automatically schedule if more than one set of resources can be used. In addition, the proposed solution prioritizes each set of resources by taking different metrics into account (e.g. the level of trust or computational costs) and tries to schedule the job to resources with the highest priority first. It is notable that the priority often mimics the physical distance from the resources to the user: a locally available Cluster usually has a higher priority due to the high level of trust and the computational costs, that are usually lower than the costs of using Cloud resources. Therefore, this scheduling strategy minimizes the costs of job execution by improving security at the same time since data is not necessarily transferred to remote resources and the probability of attacks by malicious external users is minimized. Bringing both components together results in a system that adapts automatically to the current workload by using external (e.g., Cloud) resources together with existing locally available resources or Grid sites and provides individually tailored virtual execution environments to the system's users.
DOI:https://doi.org/10.17192/z2011.0619