How does climate change affect human behavior? - Empirical evidence from three of the most exposed regions to rising sea-levels: Solomon Islands, Bangladesh, and Vietnam.

This cumulative dissertation comprises four essays that deal with the complex nexus of climate migration. In order to deal with the complexity, a behavioural economics perspective is adopted, which puts individual decisions at the centre of the analysis in order to better understand the behaviour of...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Steimanis, Ivo
Contributors: Vollan, Björn (Prof.Dr.) (Thesis advisor)
Format: Dissertation
Language:English
Published: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2019
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Summary:This cumulative dissertation comprises four essays that deal with the complex nexus of climate migration. In order to deal with the complexity, a behavioural economics perspective is adopted, which puts individual decisions at the centre of the analysis in order to better understand the behaviour of people who are particularly affected by climate change. The four papers in this thesis cover a wide range of methods, including quantitative surveys, economic experiments and model-based simulations. The data were collected between 2017 and 2019 in three of the most affected coastal regions by sea-level rise: the Solomon Islands, Bangladesh and Vietnam. One of the most important innovations, besides the behavioural economics approach, is the study of people who differ in their exposure to the effects of sea-level rise. The surveys and experiments were conducted with people within the respective region who are more or less affected by the effects of sea-level rise. This approach ensures that the participants do not differ so much in other characteristics (social, economic, cultural or historical). Such an approach makes it possible to test the reality of climate migration by providing a complete picture of the preferences, motivations, living conditions and actions of people who could be potential climate migrants.
Physical Description:194 Pages
DOI:https://doi.org/10.17192/z2020.0061