Why the clock ticks differently in Parkinson's disease: Insights from motor imagery and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

In Parkinson's disease (PD), an impaired perception of suprasecond time intervals has been reported. From a neurobiological perspective, dopamine is thought to be an important mediator of timing. Nevertheless, it is still unclear whether timing deficits in PD occur mainly in the motor context a...

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Main Authors: Ruppert-Junck, Marina Christine, Torfah, Lisa, Greuel, Andrea, Maier, Franziska, Hammes Vincent, Timmermann, Lars, Eggers, Carsten, Pedrosa, David
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2023
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Summary:In Parkinson's disease (PD), an impaired perception of suprasecond time intervals has been reported. From a neurobiological perspective, dopamine is thought to be an important mediator of timing. Nevertheless, it is still unclear whether timing deficits in PD occur mainly in the motor context and are associated with corresponding striatocortical loops. This study attempted to fill this gap by investigating time reproduction in the context of a motor imagery task, and its neurobiological correlates in resting-state networks of basal ganglia substructures in PD. Nineteen PD patients and 10 healthy controls therefore underwent two time reproduction tasks. In a motor imagery task, subjects were asked to walk down a corridor for 10 s and reproduce the time spent walking during motor imagery afterwards. In an auditory task, the subjects had to reproduce an acoustically presented time interval of 10 s. Subsequently, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed and voxel-wise regressions were conducted between striatal functional connectivity and performance in the individual task at group level and compared between groups. Patients significantly misjudged the time interval in the motor imagery task and an auditory task in comparison to controls. Seed-to-voxel functional connectivity analysis of basal ganglia substructures revealed a significant association between striatocortical connectivity and motor imagery performance. PD patients showed a different pattern of associated striatocortical connections as indicated by significantly different regression slopes for connections of the right putamen and left caudate nucleus. In accordance with previous findings, our data confirm an impaired time reproduction of suprasecond time intervals in PD patients. Our data imply that deficits in time reproduction tasks are not specific to motor context but reflect a general time reproduction deficit. According to our findings, impaired performance in context of motor imagery is accompanied by a different configuration of striatocortical resting-state networks responsible for timing.
Item Description:Gefördert durch den Open-Access-Publikationsfonds der UB Marburg.
DOI:10.1016/j.heliyon.2023.e14741