Effects of a video intervention on physicians’ acceptance of pain apps: a randomised controlled trial

The aim of our study was to determine and enhance physicians’ acceptance, performance expectancy and credibility of health apps for chronic pain patients. We further investigated predictors of acceptance. Randomised experimental trial with a parallel-group repeated measures design. Setting and...

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Main Authors: Hein, Hauke Jeldrik, Glombiewski, Julia Anna, Rief, Winfried, Riecke, Jenny
Format: Article
Language:English
Published: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2022
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Summary:The aim of our study was to determine and enhance physicians’ acceptance, performance expectancy and credibility of health apps for chronic pain patients. We further investigated predictors of acceptance. Randomised experimental trial with a parallel-group repeated measures design. Setting and participants 248 physicians working in various, mainly outpatient settings in Germany. Intervention and outcome Physicians were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (short video about health apps) or a control group (short video about chronic pain). Primary outcome measure was acceptance. Performance expectancy and credibility of health apps were secondary outcomes. In addition, we assessed 101 medical students to evaluate the effectiveness of the video intervention in young professionals. In general, physicians’ acceptance of health apps for chronic pain patients was moderate (M=9.51, SD=3.53, scale ranges from 3 to 15). All primary and secondary outcomes were enhanced by the video intervention: A repeated-measures analysis of variance yielded a significant interaction effect for acceptance (F(1, 246)=15.28, p=0.01), performance expectancy (F(1, 246)=6.10, p=0.01) and credibility (F(1, 246)=25.61, p<0.001). The same pattern of results was evident among medical students. Linear regression analysis revealed credibility (β=0.34, p<0.001) and performance expectancy (β=0.30, p<0.001) as the two strongest factors influencing acceptance, followed by scepticism (β=−0.18, p<0.001) and intuitive appeal (β=0.11, p=0.03). Conclusions and recommendations Physicians’ acceptance of health apps was moderate, and was strengthened by a 3 min video. Besides performance expectancy, credibility seems to be a promising factor associated with acceptance. Future research should focus on ways to implement acceptability-increasing interventions into routine care.
Item Description:Gefördert durch den Open-Access-Publikationsfonds der UB Marburg.
DOI:10.1136/bmjopen-2021-060020