Provenience, Provenance and the UNESCO 1970 Convention: Two Schools of Thought on the Publication of Indeterminate Artifacts

Autor/innen

  • Jody Tabitha Neal UNESCO

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17192/meta.2014.3.2720

Schlagworte:

UNESCO 1970 Convention, Provenance, Heritage Looting in the Middle East, Sale of Looted Antiquities

Abstract

This article explores the two opposing stand-points in regard to the publication of objects/artifacts of unknown provenance and the ultimate impact this has on the preservation of heritage. The debate is set against the roles and objectives of scholars, museums, heritage officials and auction houses, with an overall greater consideration as to how these arguments are impacted by the UNESCO 1970 convention, and vice versa.

Autor/innen-Biografie

Jody Tabitha Neal, UNESCO

is a museum curator of the Middle East (Saudi Arabia and Egypt), archaeologist and is currently completing a UNESCO project on the 1970 Convention in South and South-East Asia.

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Veröffentlicht

2014-10-30

Zitationsvorschlag

Neal, J. T. „Provenience, Provenance and the UNESCO 1970 Convention: Two Schools of Thought on the Publication of Indeterminate Artifacts“. Middle East - Topics &Amp; Arguments, Bd. 3, Oktober 2014, S. 19-28, doi:10.17192/meta.2014.3.2720.

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Rubrik

Anti/Thesis