Energy-efficient Transitional Near-* Computing

Studies have shown that communication networks, devices accessing the Internet, and data centers account for 4.6% of the worldwide electricity consumption. Although data centers, core network equipment, and mobile devices are getting more energy-efficient, the amount of data that is being processed...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Graubner, Pablo Karl
Contributors: Freisleben, Bernd (Prof. Dr.) (Thesis advisor)
Format: Dissertation
Language:English
Published: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2018
Mathematik und Informatik
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Summary:Studies have shown that communication networks, devices accessing the Internet, and data centers account for 4.6% of the worldwide electricity consumption. Although data centers, core network equipment, and mobile devices are getting more energy-efficient, the amount of data that is being processed, transferred, and stored is vastly increasing. Recent computer paradigms, such as fog and edge computing, try to improve this situation by processing data near the user, the network, the devices, and the data itself. In this thesis, these trends are summarized under the new term near-* or near-everything computing. Furthermore, a novel paradigm designed to increase the energy efficiency of near-* computing is proposed: transitional computing. It transfers multi-mechanism transitions, a recently developed paradigm for a highly adaptable future Internet, from the field of communication systems to computing systems. Moreover, three types of novel transitions are introduced to achieve gains in energy efficiency in near-* environments, spanning from private Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) clouds, Software-defined Wireless Networks (SDWNs) at the edge of the network, Disruption-Tolerant Information-Centric Networks (DTN-ICNs) involving mobile devices, sensors, edge devices as well as programmable components on a mobile System-on-a-Chip (SoC). Finally, the novel idea of transitional near-* computing for emergency response applications is presented to assist rescuers and affected persons during an emergency event or a disaster, although connections to cloud services and social networks might be disturbed by network outages, and network bandwidth and battery power of mobile devices might be limited.
Physical Description:217 Pages
DOI:https://doi.org/10.17192/z2019.0052