Scientific Workflows for Metabolic Flux Analysis

Metabolic engineering is a highly interdisciplinary research domain that interfaces biology, mathematics, computer science, and engineering. Metabolic flux analysis with carbon tracer experiments (13 C-MFA) is a particularly challenging metabolic engineering application that consists of several tigh...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Dalman, Tolga
Contributors: Freisleben, Bernd (Prof. Dr.) (Thesis advisor)
Format: Dissertation
Language:English
Published: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2017
Mathematik und Informatik
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Summary:Metabolic engineering is a highly interdisciplinary research domain that interfaces biology, mathematics, computer science, and engineering. Metabolic flux analysis with carbon tracer experiments (13 C-MFA) is a particularly challenging metabolic engineering application that consists of several tightly interwoven building blocks such as modeling, simulation, and experimental design. While several general-purpose workflow solutions have emerged in recent years to support the realization of complex scientific applications, the transferability of these approaches are only partially applicable to 13C-MFA workflows. While problems in other research fields (e.g., bioinformatics) are primarily centered around scientific data processing, 13C-MFA workflows have more in common with business workflows. For instance, many bioinformatics workflows are designed to identify, compare, and annotate genomic sequences by "pipelining" them through standard tools like BLAST. Typically, the next workflow task in the pipeline can be automatically determined by the outcome of the previous step. Five computational challenges have been identified in the endeavor of conducting 13 C-MFA studies: organization of heterogeneous data, standardization of processes and the unification of tools and data, interactive workflow steering, distributed computing, and service orientation. The outcome of this thesis is a scientific workflow framework (SWF) that is custom-tailored for the specific requirements of 13 C-MFA applications. The proposed approach – namely, designing the SWF as a collection of loosely-coupled modules that are glued together with web services – alleviates the realization of 13C-MFA workflows by offering several features. By design, existing tools are integrated into the SWF using web service interfaces and foreign programming language bindings (e.g., Java or Python). Although the attributes "easy-to-use" and "general-purpose" are rarely associated with distributed computing software, the presented use cases show that the proposed Hadoop MapReduce framework eases the deployment of computationally demanding simulations on cloud and cluster computing resources. An important building block for allowing interactive researcher-driven workflows is the ability to track all data that is needed to understand and reproduce a workflow. The standardization of 13 C-MFA studies using a folder structure template and the corresponding services and web interfaces improves the exchange of information for a group of researchers. Finally, several auxiliary tools are developed in the course of this work to complement the SWF modules, i.e., ranging from simple helper scripts to visualization or data conversion programs. This solution distinguishes itself from other scientific workflow approaches by offering a system of loosely-coupled components that are flexibly arranged to match the typical requirements in the metabolic engineering domain. Being a modern and service-oriented software framework, new applications are easily composed by reusing existing components.
DOI:https://doi.org/10.17192/z2017.0249