Ambiguous Perception and Selective Attention - Competitive Processes in Complex Scenarios

Unser visuelles System wird jeden Tag mit komplexen und mehrdeutigen Szenen und Ereignissen konfrontiert. Diese Informationen müssen weitergeleitet, gefiltert und verarbeitet werden, um uns ein angemessenes Verhalten in unserer Umwelt zu ermöglichen. Visuelle Wahrnehmung ist dieser Prozess der Inter...

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Main Author: Marx, Svenja
Contributors: Einhäuser-Treyer, Wolfgang (Prof. Dr.) (Thesis advisor)
Format: Dissertation
Language:English
Published: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2015
Physik
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167. Chapter 2.5 is published as Marx S, Respondek G*, Stamelou M, Dowiasch S, Stoll J, Bremmer F, Oertel W H, Höglinger G U**, & Einhäuser W** (2012). Validation of mobile eye-tracking as novel and efficient means for differentiating progres- sive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 6(88).


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171. Chapter 2.2 is published as Marx S,Gruenhage G, Walper D, Rutishauser U, & Einhäuser W (2015). Competition with and without priority control: linking rivalry to attention through winner-take-all networks with memory. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1339, 138-153.


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176. Stoll, J., Thrun, M., Nuthmann, A., & Einhäuser, W. (2015). Overt attention in natural scenes: Objects dominate features. Vision Research, 107 , 36–48.


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179. Lich, M., & Bremmer, F. (2014). Self-motion perception in the elderly. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8 , 681.


180. Chapter 2.4 is published as Dowiasch S., Marx S, Einhäuser W, & Bremmer F (2015). Effects of aging on eye movements in the real world. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9(46).