Modified forests are vital for species communities and ecological functionality in a heterogeneous South African landscape

Land-use change is a major threat to forest ecosystems worldwide. Therefore, understanding the effects of human forest modification on biodiversity is an important task for conservation ecologists. The main objective of my dissertation was to evaluate how different intensities of forest modification...

Ausführliche Beschreibung

Gespeichert in:
1. Verfasser: Neuschulz, Eike Lena
Beteiligte: Farwig, Nina (Prof. Dr.) (BetreuerIn (Doktorarbeit))
Format: Dissertation
Sprache:Englisch
Veröffentlicht: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2011
Biologie
Ausgabe:http://dx.doi.org/10.17192/z2011.0652
Schlagworte:
Online Zugang:PDF-Volltext
Tags: Tag hinzufügen
Keine Tags, Fügen Sie den ersten Tag hinzu!
description Land-use change is a major threat to forest ecosystems worldwide. Therefore, understanding the effects of human forest modification on biodiversity is an important task for conservation ecologists. The main objective of my dissertation was to evaluate how different intensities of forest modification contribute to the maintenance of species diversity and ecosystem functionality in a human-modified landscape. For this purpose, I based my studies in a heterogeneous landscape around two nature reserves, Vernon Crookes and Oribi Gorge, in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. I selected six most representative types of scarp forest modification – ranging from continuous forest and natural forest fragments in nature reserves to fragments within plantations and agricultural matrix, forested gardens, and secondary forest. In a total of 36 study sites, I assessed flower-visiting insects using insect traps and recorded local bird assemblages with point counts. Further, I observed flower visitation and seed removal on the native and widespread tree Celtis africana (Ulmacea) to analyse whether forest modification affects pollination and seed dispersal services. To assess how forest configuration affects the dispersal of animals, I carried out an in-depth study on the movement behaviour of bird assemblages within and among forest patches in the Vernon Crookes region. By means of direct observations and bird mist-netting, I followed up bird movements across nine forest fragments belonging to three different forest types. In all these three projects I give special attention to the responses of the different functional groups of a species community. The richness of flower-visiting insects, community composition and flower visitation on C. africana differed significantly among the different forest types and between two study seasons in 2009 and 2010. Both flower visitor richness and flower visitation rates were strongly enhanced in the human-modified forests. This could be explained by a high abundance of large-bodied pollinators in these sites. In particular, feral honey bees (Apis mellifera) played a major role in the pollination of C. africana trees located in forest fragments within plantations and agriculture, forested gardens and secondary forests. However, effective fruit set of C. africana was not enhanced by an increase of flower visitation, possibly due to the tree’s capability of wind pollination. This implies that even though forest modification can strongly alter insect assemblages, pollination services for trees with unspecialized flowers may remain resilient at a landscape scale. Bird species richness was not significantly different among forest types. However, I found a significant increase in bird abundance in modified forests. In particular, fragments within agriculture, forested gardens, and secondary forests attracted a large number of forest generalists, shrubland and open country species. The abundance of forest specialists however, was much lower in modified forests. Changes in the composition of bird functional groups were also confirmed by multivariate analysis, which clearly separated bird communities by forest type. I found the highest abundance of frugivores visiting C. africana in natural forest fragments, fragments within agriculture, forested gardens and secondary forests. That was also true for the estimated total fruit removal per C. africana tree, even though the differences among the forest types were not significant. In summary, I could show that overall bird abundance and seed removal services can be enhanced in modified forests. However, the results also underline the importance of protected natural forest for bird specialist species sensitive to human disturbance. I found a very high movement activity of the overall bird community among the nine forest fragments that was significantly structured by bird functional groups. Especially, frugivorous birds, forest specialists and large-bodied species showed the highest dispersal abilities across the landscape. These results might be facilitated by overall high fragment quality, providing food and shelter, as well as the close proximity among the forest fragments within the landscape. Yet, a fourth-corner analysis revealed that even though modified forests were rather attractive to frugivores, forest specialists as well as large-bodied species, there was still a high affinity of the latter functional groups to natural forest fragments, close canopy cover and large fragment size. Only a small proportion of the overall bird community was recorded to steadily persist in the forest fragments. In particular, patches in the agricultural landscape were frequently used by resident insectivores and forest generalists. Ultimately, these findings suggest that remnant forest fragments may represent valuable stepping-stones as well as permanent habitat for many forest birds and thus, will help to maintain regional bird assemblages in human-modified landscapes. Overall, my results strongly suggest that modified forests contribute to the maintenance of species diversity and ecosystem functionality in a human-modified landscape. With respect to a vast increase of human-modified forests worldwide, evidence of a high conservation potential of these habitats is encouraging news for conservation managers. In particular, modified forests that are located in close proximity to protected areas have high conservation priority as they may expand buffer zones around natural forests in human-modified landscapes. Generalizations, however, should be considered with caution. My findings strongly emphasize that human-modified forests do not completely compensate for the overall loss of natural habitat. High sensitivity of forest specialist species and overall changes in local community composition demonstrate that natural forests are essential to maintain species diversity at a larger scale. Additionally, high flexibility towards habitat changes of many species in the study region might be based on the patchy historic distribution of scarp forest that has strongly been determined by terrain and orographic conditions of the environment. Thus, it is possible that an evolutionary adaptation has lessened the vulnerability of the region’s fauna and flora to the present anthropogenic forest fragmentation. Ultimately, most of the forest types in the study region are characterized by high habitat quality, including for example resource availability, structural heterogeneity and close proximity to further forest patches, so that altogether, they contribute to the high species diversity. Consequently, the maintenance of structurally rich forest habitat is essential to maintain species diversity and ecological functionality in human-modified landscapes.
author Neuschulz, Eike Lena
spellingShingle Neuschulz, Eike Lena
Allgemeines, Wissenschaft
land-use change
forest
Biodiversität
South Africa
Südafrika
ecosystem functioning
Waldökosystem
biodiversity
Ökosystemfunktionen
Landnutzung
Global werden Waldökosysteme durch den fortschreitenden Wandel menschlicher Landnutzung bedroht. Es ist daher von zentraler Bedeutung, die Auswirkungen anthropogener Eingriffe auf die Biodiversität und Ökosystemfunktionen von Wäldern zu erforschen. In der vorliegenden Arbeit analysierte ich, inwiefern unterschiedlich stark vom Menschen modifizierte Wälder zum Erhalt von Artenreichtum und ökosystemarer Funktionalität in anthropogen geprägten Südafrikanischen Landschaften beitragen. Alle Untersuchungen wurden in subtropischen Hangwäldern („scarp forests“) in den Schutzgebieten Oribi Gorge und Vernon Crookes und deren Umgebung in der Provinz KwaZulu-Natal durchgeführt. Ich wählte sechs für die Region typische Formen menschlicher Waldmodifikation. Diese reichten von kontinuierlichen Wäldern und natürlichen Waldfragmenten in Schutzgebieten bis hin zu Fragmenten in einer Matrix aus Eukalyptusplantagen und Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Farmgärten und Sekundärwäldern in Wildparks. In insgesamt 36 Untersuchungsflächen erfasste ich die Diversität blütenbesuchender Insekten mit Insektenfallen und nahm die Vogeldiversität mit Punktstopp-Zählungen auf. Ferner beobachtete ich die Aktivität von Blütenbesuchern und fruchtfressenden Vögeln an der einheimischen Baumart Celtis africana (Ulmaceae), um zu untersuchen, ob Waldmodifikation die ökosystemaren Dienstleistungen Bestäubung und Samenausbreitung beeinflusst. In einer weiteren Studie untersuchte ich die lokalen Bewegungsmuster von Vogelgemeinschaften zwischen modifizierten Waldfragmenten in der Region um Vernon Crookes. Mit Hilfe von direkten Flugbeobachtungen und Netzfängen verfolgte ich die Bewegungen von Vögeln zwischen neun Fragmenten in drei unterschiedlich modifizierten Waldtypen. In allen Projekten untersuchte ich in besonderem Maße die Reaktionen verschiedener funktioneller Gruppen einer Artengemeinschaft auf die anthropogene Waldmodifikation. Der Artenreichtum und die Artenzusammensetzung blütenbesuchender Insekten sowie die Blütenbesuche an C. africana unterschieden sich zwischen den Waldtypen und zwei aufeinanderfolgenden Untersuchungsjahren. Besonders in modifizierten Wäldern waren Artenreichtum und Besuchsraten erhöht, aufgrund einer starken Abundanz besonders großer Insekten. Vor allem die Honigbiene (Apis mellifera) spielte eine wichtige Rolle für die Bestäubung von C. africana in Waldfragmenten in Eukalyptusplantagen und Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Gärten und Sekundärwäldern. Die erhöhten Besuchsraten steigerten den effektiven Samenansatz von C. africana jedoch nicht, möglicherweise bedingt durch die Fähigkeit der Baumart zur Windbestäubung. Diese Ergebnisse weisen darauf hin, dass Bestäubungsprozesse an Bäumen mit unspezialisierten Blüten - trotz veränderter Insektengemeinschaften in modifizierten Wäldern - aufrecht erhalten werden können. Die Waldtypen unterschieden sich nicht im Artenreichtum ihrer Vogelgemeinschaften. Jedoch zeigte sich ein signifikanter Anstieg der Vogelabundanz in modifizierten Wäldern. Insbesondere Waldfragmente in Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Gärten und Sekundärwäldern wurden von vielen Waldgeneralisten und Offenlandarten aufgesucht. Waldspezialisten hingegen waren in modifizierten Wäldern sehr selten. Multivariate Analysen bestätigten die Verschiebungen in der Zusammensetzung von funktionellen Gruppen entlang des Störungsgradienten. Ich beobachtete die höchsten Abundanzen fruchtfressender Vögel an C. africana in natürlichen Waldfragmenten, Fragmenten in Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Gärten und Sekundärwäldern. Dort waren auch die geschätzten Fraßraten von C. africana Früchten am höchsten, jedoch unterschieden sich diese nicht signifikant zwischen den Waldtypen. Insgesamt weisen diese Ergebnisse auf eine erhöhte Vogelabundanz sowie erhöhte Fruchtfraßraten in modifizierten Wäldern hin. Dennoch verdeutlicht die Studie auch die Bedeutung geschützter Wälder als Rückzugsräume für spezialisierte Vogelarten. Die sehr hohe Bewegungsaktivität der Vogelgemeinschaft zwischen den neun Waldfragmenten war stark durch unterschiedliches Verhalten funktioneller Gruppen strukturiert. Besonders fruchtfressende Arten, Waldspezialisten und große Vögel zeigten eine hohe Ausbreitungsfähigkeit in der fragmentierten Landschaft. Die Nähe der Fragmente zueinander sowie deren gute Habitatqualität könnten die große Flexibilität auch spezialisierter Vogelarten erklären. Eine „fourth-corner“ Analyse zeigte dennoch, dass fruchtfressende Arten, Waldspezialisten und große Vögel eine starke Affinität zu natürlichen Fragmenten, geschlossenem Kronendach und großen Fragmenten hatten. Nur ein kleiner Teil der Vogelgemeinschaft schien in den Fragmenten sesshaft zu sein. Besonders insektenfressende und generalistische Vogelarten bewohnten die Waldfragmente in Zuckerrohrfeldern. Meine Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Waldfragmente in heterogenen Landschaften zum einen als wichtige Trittsteine für mobile Arten, zum anderen aber auch als Rückzugsraum standorttreuer Arten fungieren. Somit können auch modifizierte Wälder zum Erhalt der regionalen Vogelvielfalt in vom Menschen geprägten Landschaften beitragen. Zusammenfassend lässt sich feststellen, dass modifizierte Wälder durchaus zum Erhalt von Artenvielfalt und ökosystemarer Funktionalität in heterogenen Landschaften beitragen. Vor dem Hintergrund der weltweiten Zunahme anthropogener Einflüsse auf Wälder, ist besonders aus naturschutzfachlicher Sicht ein hohes Potential modifizierter Wälder Grund zur Ermutigung. Vor allem modifizierte Wälder in räumlicher Nähe zu Schutzgebieten sollten hohe Schutzpriorität genießen, da sie als Pufferzonen für natürliche Wälder in anthropogen beeinflussten Landschaften fungieren können. Bei einer Verallgemeinerung der Ergebnisse ist jedoch Vorsicht geboten. Es zeigte sich, dass modifizierte Wälder den Verlust natürlicher Wälder nicht vollständig kompensierten. Eine hohe Sensitivität von Waldspezialisten und allgemeine Verschiebungen der Zusammensetzung von Artengemeinschaften in modifizierten Wäldern machten deutlich, dass natürliche Wälder essentiell für den Erhalt der Biodiversität sind. Eine zusätzliche Erklärung für die hohe Flexibilität der Artengemeinschaften gegenüber anthropogener Waldmodifikation kann die Geschichte der Untersuchungsregion liefern. Die Tatsache, dass Hangwälder schon durch die Orographie stets voneinander isoliert vorkamen, hat möglicherweise eine evolutionäre Anpassung der Arten hervorgebracht, die die Anfälligkeit der heutigen Flora und Fauna gegenüber Fragmentierung vermindert. Schließlich zeichneten sich die Waldfragmente durch eine gute Habitatqualität aus, die durch hohe Ressourcenverfügbarkeit, strukturelle Heterogenität und kurze Distanzen zwischen den Fragmenten zu einem hohen Artenreichtum beitrug. Folglich ist der Erhalt von strukturreichen Wäldern essentiell für den Schutz von Artenvielfalt und Ökosystemfunktionen in vom Menschen modifizierten Landschaften.
Modified forests are vital for species communities and ecological functionality in a heterogeneous South African landscape
url http://archiv.ub.uni-marburg.de/diss/z2011/0652/pdf/deln.pdf
doi_str_mv http://dx.doi.org/10.17192/z2011.0652
edition http://dx.doi.org/10.17192/z2011.0652
license_str http://archiv.ub.uni-marburg.de/adm/urhg.html
oai_set_str_mv open_access
ddc:000
doc-type:doctoralThesis
xMetaDissPlus
language English
dewey-raw 000
dewey-search 000
genre Generalities
genre_facet Generalities
topic_facet Allgemeines, Wissenschaft
topic Allgemeines, Wissenschaft
land-use change
forest
Biodiversität
South Africa
Südafrika
ecosystem functioning
Waldökosystem
biodiversity
Ökosystemfunktionen
Landnutzung
title_alt Artenvielfalt und Ökosystemfunktionen in anthropogen geprägten südafrikanischen Wäldern
format Dissertation
contents Global werden Waldökosysteme durch den fortschreitenden Wandel menschlicher Landnutzung bedroht. Es ist daher von zentraler Bedeutung, die Auswirkungen anthropogener Eingriffe auf die Biodiversität und Ökosystemfunktionen von Wäldern zu erforschen. In der vorliegenden Arbeit analysierte ich, inwiefern unterschiedlich stark vom Menschen modifizierte Wälder zum Erhalt von Artenreichtum und ökosystemarer Funktionalität in anthropogen geprägten Südafrikanischen Landschaften beitragen. Alle Untersuchungen wurden in subtropischen Hangwäldern („scarp forests“) in den Schutzgebieten Oribi Gorge und Vernon Crookes und deren Umgebung in der Provinz KwaZulu-Natal durchgeführt. Ich wählte sechs für die Region typische Formen menschlicher Waldmodifikation. Diese reichten von kontinuierlichen Wäldern und natürlichen Waldfragmenten in Schutzgebieten bis hin zu Fragmenten in einer Matrix aus Eukalyptusplantagen und Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Farmgärten und Sekundärwäldern in Wildparks. In insgesamt 36 Untersuchungsflächen erfasste ich die Diversität blütenbesuchender Insekten mit Insektenfallen und nahm die Vogeldiversität mit Punktstopp-Zählungen auf. Ferner beobachtete ich die Aktivität von Blütenbesuchern und fruchtfressenden Vögeln an der einheimischen Baumart Celtis africana (Ulmaceae), um zu untersuchen, ob Waldmodifikation die ökosystemaren Dienstleistungen Bestäubung und Samenausbreitung beeinflusst. In einer weiteren Studie untersuchte ich die lokalen Bewegungsmuster von Vogelgemeinschaften zwischen modifizierten Waldfragmenten in der Region um Vernon Crookes. Mit Hilfe von direkten Flugbeobachtungen und Netzfängen verfolgte ich die Bewegungen von Vögeln zwischen neun Fragmenten in drei unterschiedlich modifizierten Waldtypen. In allen Projekten untersuchte ich in besonderem Maße die Reaktionen verschiedener funktioneller Gruppen einer Artengemeinschaft auf die anthropogene Waldmodifikation. Der Artenreichtum und die Artenzusammensetzung blütenbesuchender Insekten sowie die Blütenbesuche an C. africana unterschieden sich zwischen den Waldtypen und zwei aufeinanderfolgenden Untersuchungsjahren. Besonders in modifizierten Wäldern waren Artenreichtum und Besuchsraten erhöht, aufgrund einer starken Abundanz besonders großer Insekten. Vor allem die Honigbiene (Apis mellifera) spielte eine wichtige Rolle für die Bestäubung von C. africana in Waldfragmenten in Eukalyptusplantagen und Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Gärten und Sekundärwäldern. Die erhöhten Besuchsraten steigerten den effektiven Samenansatz von C. africana jedoch nicht, möglicherweise bedingt durch die Fähigkeit der Baumart zur Windbestäubung. Diese Ergebnisse weisen darauf hin, dass Bestäubungsprozesse an Bäumen mit unspezialisierten Blüten - trotz veränderter Insektengemeinschaften in modifizierten Wäldern - aufrecht erhalten werden können. Die Waldtypen unterschieden sich nicht im Artenreichtum ihrer Vogelgemeinschaften. Jedoch zeigte sich ein signifikanter Anstieg der Vogelabundanz in modifizierten Wäldern. Insbesondere Waldfragmente in Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Gärten und Sekundärwäldern wurden von vielen Waldgeneralisten und Offenlandarten aufgesucht. Waldspezialisten hingegen waren in modifizierten Wäldern sehr selten. Multivariate Analysen bestätigten die Verschiebungen in der Zusammensetzung von funktionellen Gruppen entlang des Störungsgradienten. Ich beobachtete die höchsten Abundanzen fruchtfressender Vögel an C. africana in natürlichen Waldfragmenten, Fragmenten in Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Gärten und Sekundärwäldern. Dort waren auch die geschätzten Fraßraten von C. africana Früchten am höchsten, jedoch unterschieden sich diese nicht signifikant zwischen den Waldtypen. Insgesamt weisen diese Ergebnisse auf eine erhöhte Vogelabundanz sowie erhöhte Fruchtfraßraten in modifizierten Wäldern hin. Dennoch verdeutlicht die Studie auch die Bedeutung geschützter Wälder als Rückzugsräume für spezialisierte Vogelarten. Die sehr hohe Bewegungsaktivität der Vogelgemeinschaft zwischen den neun Waldfragmenten war stark durch unterschiedliches Verhalten funktioneller Gruppen strukturiert. Besonders fruchtfressende Arten, Waldspezialisten und große Vögel zeigten eine hohe Ausbreitungsfähigkeit in der fragmentierten Landschaft. Die Nähe der Fragmente zueinander sowie deren gute Habitatqualität könnten die große Flexibilität auch spezialisierter Vogelarten erklären. Eine „fourth-corner“ Analyse zeigte dennoch, dass fruchtfressende Arten, Waldspezialisten und große Vögel eine starke Affinität zu natürlichen Fragmenten, geschlossenem Kronendach und großen Fragmenten hatten. Nur ein kleiner Teil der Vogelgemeinschaft schien in den Fragmenten sesshaft zu sein. Besonders insektenfressende und generalistische Vogelarten bewohnten die Waldfragmente in Zuckerrohrfeldern. Meine Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Waldfragmente in heterogenen Landschaften zum einen als wichtige Trittsteine für mobile Arten, zum anderen aber auch als Rückzugsraum standorttreuer Arten fungieren. Somit können auch modifizierte Wälder zum Erhalt der regionalen Vogelvielfalt in vom Menschen geprägten Landschaften beitragen. Zusammenfassend lässt sich feststellen, dass modifizierte Wälder durchaus zum Erhalt von Artenvielfalt und ökosystemarer Funktionalität in heterogenen Landschaften beitragen. Vor dem Hintergrund der weltweiten Zunahme anthropogener Einflüsse auf Wälder, ist besonders aus naturschutzfachlicher Sicht ein hohes Potential modifizierter Wälder Grund zur Ermutigung. Vor allem modifizierte Wälder in räumlicher Nähe zu Schutzgebieten sollten hohe Schutzpriorität genießen, da sie als Pufferzonen für natürliche Wälder in anthropogen beeinflussten Landschaften fungieren können. Bei einer Verallgemeinerung der Ergebnisse ist jedoch Vorsicht geboten. Es zeigte sich, dass modifizierte Wälder den Verlust natürlicher Wälder nicht vollständig kompensierten. Eine hohe Sensitivität von Waldspezialisten und allgemeine Verschiebungen der Zusammensetzung von Artengemeinschaften in modifizierten Wäldern machten deutlich, dass natürliche Wälder essentiell für den Erhalt der Biodiversität sind. Eine zusätzliche Erklärung für die hohe Flexibilität der Artengemeinschaften gegenüber anthropogener Waldmodifikation kann die Geschichte der Untersuchungsregion liefern. Die Tatsache, dass Hangwälder schon durch die Orographie stets voneinander isoliert vorkamen, hat möglicherweise eine evolutionäre Anpassung der Arten hervorgebracht, die die Anfälligkeit der heutigen Flora und Fauna gegenüber Fragmentierung vermindert. Schließlich zeichneten sich die Waldfragmente durch eine gute Habitatqualität aus, die durch hohe Ressourcenverfügbarkeit, strukturelle Heterogenität und kurze Distanzen zwischen den Fragmenten zu einem hohen Artenreichtum beitrug. Folglich ist der Erhalt von strukturreichen Wäldern essentiell für den Schutz von Artenvielfalt und Ökosystemfunktionen in vom Menschen modifizierten Landschaften.
publisher Philipps-Universität Marburg
building Fachbereich Biologie
first_indexed 2011-12-19T00:00:00Z
author2 Farwig, Nina (Prof. Dr.)
author2_role ths
publishDate 2011
era_facet 2011
institution Biologie
last_indexed 2011-12-21T23:59:59Z
title Modified forests are vital for species communities and ecological functionality in a heterogeneous South African landscape
title_short Modified forests are vital for species communities and ecological functionality in a heterogeneous South African landscape
title_full Modified forests are vital for species communities and ecological functionality in a heterogeneous South African landscape
title_fullStr Modified forests are vital for species communities and ecological functionality in a heterogeneous South African landscape
title_full_unstemmed Modified forests are vital for species communities and ecological functionality in a heterogeneous South African landscape
title_sort Modified forests are vital for species communities and ecological functionality in a heterogeneous South African landscape
thumbnail http://archiv.ub.uni-marburg.de/diss/z2011/0652/cover.png
spelling diss/z2011/0652 Land-use change is a major threat to forest ecosystems worldwide. Therefore, understanding the effects of human forest modification on biodiversity is an important task for conservation ecologists. The main objective of my dissertation was to evaluate how different intensities of forest modification contribute to the maintenance of species diversity and ecosystem functionality in a human-modified landscape. For this purpose, I based my studies in a heterogeneous landscape around two nature reserves, Vernon Crookes and Oribi Gorge, in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. I selected six most representative types of scarp forest modification – ranging from continuous forest and natural forest fragments in nature reserves to fragments within plantations and agricultural matrix, forested gardens, and secondary forest. In a total of 36 study sites, I assessed flower-visiting insects using insect traps and recorded local bird assemblages with point counts. Further, I observed flower visitation and seed removal on the native and widespread tree Celtis africana (Ulmacea) to analyse whether forest modification affects pollination and seed dispersal services. To assess how forest configuration affects the dispersal of animals, I carried out an in-depth study on the movement behaviour of bird assemblages within and among forest patches in the Vernon Crookes region. By means of direct observations and bird mist-netting, I followed up bird movements across nine forest fragments belonging to three different forest types. In all these three projects I give special attention to the responses of the different functional groups of a species community. The richness of flower-visiting insects, community composition and flower visitation on C. africana differed significantly among the different forest types and between two study seasons in 2009 and 2010. Both flower visitor richness and flower visitation rates were strongly enhanced in the human-modified forests. This could be explained by a high abundance of large-bodied pollinators in these sites. In particular, feral honey bees (Apis mellifera) played a major role in the pollination of C. africana trees located in forest fragments within plantations and agriculture, forested gardens and secondary forests. However, effective fruit set of C. africana was not enhanced by an increase of flower visitation, possibly due to the tree’s capability of wind pollination. This implies that even though forest modification can strongly alter insect assemblages, pollination services for trees with unspecialized flowers may remain resilient at a landscape scale. Bird species richness was not significantly different among forest types. However, I found a significant increase in bird abundance in modified forests. In particular, fragments within agriculture, forested gardens, and secondary forests attracted a large number of forest generalists, shrubland and open country species. The abundance of forest specialists however, was much lower in modified forests. Changes in the composition of bird functional groups were also confirmed by multivariate analysis, which clearly separated bird communities by forest type. I found the highest abundance of frugivores visiting C. africana in natural forest fragments, fragments within agriculture, forested gardens and secondary forests. That was also true for the estimated total fruit removal per C. africana tree, even though the differences among the forest types were not significant. In summary, I could show that overall bird abundance and seed removal services can be enhanced in modified forests. However, the results also underline the importance of protected natural forest for bird specialist species sensitive to human disturbance. I found a very high movement activity of the overall bird community among the nine forest fragments that was significantly structured by bird functional groups. Especially, frugivorous birds, forest specialists and large-bodied species showed the highest dispersal abilities across the landscape. These results might be facilitated by overall high fragment quality, providing food and shelter, as well as the close proximity among the forest fragments within the landscape. Yet, a fourth-corner analysis revealed that even though modified forests were rather attractive to frugivores, forest specialists as well as large-bodied species, there was still a high affinity of the latter functional groups to natural forest fragments, close canopy cover and large fragment size. Only a small proportion of the overall bird community was recorded to steadily persist in the forest fragments. In particular, patches in the agricultural landscape were frequently used by resident insectivores and forest generalists. Ultimately, these findings suggest that remnant forest fragments may represent valuable stepping-stones as well as permanent habitat for many forest birds and thus, will help to maintain regional bird assemblages in human-modified landscapes. Overall, my results strongly suggest that modified forests contribute to the maintenance of species diversity and ecosystem functionality in a human-modified landscape. With respect to a vast increase of human-modified forests worldwide, evidence of a high conservation potential of these habitats is encouraging news for conservation managers. In particular, modified forests that are located in close proximity to protected areas have high conservation priority as they may expand buffer zones around natural forests in human-modified landscapes. Generalizations, however, should be considered with caution. My findings strongly emphasize that human-modified forests do not completely compensate for the overall loss of natural habitat. High sensitivity of forest specialist species and overall changes in local community composition demonstrate that natural forests are essential to maintain species diversity at a larger scale. Additionally, high flexibility towards habitat changes of many species in the study region might be based on the patchy historic distribution of scarp forest that has strongly been determined by terrain and orographic conditions of the environment. Thus, it is possible that an evolutionary adaptation has lessened the vulnerability of the region’s fauna and flora to the present anthropogenic forest fragmentation. Ultimately, most of the forest types in the study region are characterized by high habitat quality, including for example resource availability, structural heterogeneity and close proximity to further forest patches, so that altogether, they contribute to the high species diversity. Consequently, the maintenance of structurally rich forest habitat is essential to maintain species diversity and ecological functionality in human-modified landscapes. http://dx.doi.org/10.17192/z2011.0652 Artenvielfalt und Ökosystemfunktionen in anthropogen geprägten südafrikanischen Wäldern Global werden Waldökosysteme durch den fortschreitenden Wandel menschlicher Landnutzung bedroht. Es ist daher von zentraler Bedeutung, die Auswirkungen anthropogener Eingriffe auf die Biodiversität und Ökosystemfunktionen von Wäldern zu erforschen. In der vorliegenden Arbeit analysierte ich, inwiefern unterschiedlich stark vom Menschen modifizierte Wälder zum Erhalt von Artenreichtum und ökosystemarer Funktionalität in anthropogen geprägten Südafrikanischen Landschaften beitragen. Alle Untersuchungen wurden in subtropischen Hangwäldern („scarp forests“) in den Schutzgebieten Oribi Gorge und Vernon Crookes und deren Umgebung in der Provinz KwaZulu-Natal durchgeführt. Ich wählte sechs für die Region typische Formen menschlicher Waldmodifikation. Diese reichten von kontinuierlichen Wäldern und natürlichen Waldfragmenten in Schutzgebieten bis hin zu Fragmenten in einer Matrix aus Eukalyptusplantagen und Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Farmgärten und Sekundärwäldern in Wildparks. In insgesamt 36 Untersuchungsflächen erfasste ich die Diversität blütenbesuchender Insekten mit Insektenfallen und nahm die Vogeldiversität mit Punktstopp-Zählungen auf. Ferner beobachtete ich die Aktivität von Blütenbesuchern und fruchtfressenden Vögeln an der einheimischen Baumart Celtis africana (Ulmaceae), um zu untersuchen, ob Waldmodifikation die ökosystemaren Dienstleistungen Bestäubung und Samenausbreitung beeinflusst. In einer weiteren Studie untersuchte ich die lokalen Bewegungsmuster von Vogelgemeinschaften zwischen modifizierten Waldfragmenten in der Region um Vernon Crookes. Mit Hilfe von direkten Flugbeobachtungen und Netzfängen verfolgte ich die Bewegungen von Vögeln zwischen neun Fragmenten in drei unterschiedlich modifizierten Waldtypen. In allen Projekten untersuchte ich in besonderem Maße die Reaktionen verschiedener funktioneller Gruppen einer Artengemeinschaft auf die anthropogene Waldmodifikation. Der Artenreichtum und die Artenzusammensetzung blütenbesuchender Insekten sowie die Blütenbesuche an C. africana unterschieden sich zwischen den Waldtypen und zwei aufeinanderfolgenden Untersuchungsjahren. Besonders in modifizierten Wäldern waren Artenreichtum und Besuchsraten erhöht, aufgrund einer starken Abundanz besonders großer Insekten. Vor allem die Honigbiene (Apis mellifera) spielte eine wichtige Rolle für die Bestäubung von C. africana in Waldfragmenten in Eukalyptusplantagen und Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Gärten und Sekundärwäldern. Die erhöhten Besuchsraten steigerten den effektiven Samenansatz von C. africana jedoch nicht, möglicherweise bedingt durch die Fähigkeit der Baumart zur Windbestäubung. Diese Ergebnisse weisen darauf hin, dass Bestäubungsprozesse an Bäumen mit unspezialisierten Blüten - trotz veränderter Insektengemeinschaften in modifizierten Wäldern - aufrecht erhalten werden können. Die Waldtypen unterschieden sich nicht im Artenreichtum ihrer Vogelgemeinschaften. Jedoch zeigte sich ein signifikanter Anstieg der Vogelabundanz in modifizierten Wäldern. Insbesondere Waldfragmente in Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Gärten und Sekundärwäldern wurden von vielen Waldgeneralisten und Offenlandarten aufgesucht. Waldspezialisten hingegen waren in modifizierten Wäldern sehr selten. Multivariate Analysen bestätigten die Verschiebungen in der Zusammensetzung von funktionellen Gruppen entlang des Störungsgradienten. Ich beobachtete die höchsten Abundanzen fruchtfressender Vögel an C. africana in natürlichen Waldfragmenten, Fragmenten in Zuckerrohrfeldern, bewaldeten Gärten und Sekundärwäldern. Dort waren auch die geschätzten Fraßraten von C. africana Früchten am höchsten, jedoch unterschieden sich diese nicht signifikant zwischen den Waldtypen. Insgesamt weisen diese Ergebnisse auf eine erhöhte Vogelabundanz sowie erhöhte Fruchtfraßraten in modifizierten Wäldern hin. Dennoch verdeutlicht die Studie auch die Bedeutung geschützter Wälder als Rückzugsräume für spezialisierte Vogelarten. Die sehr hohe Bewegungsaktivität der Vogelgemeinschaft zwischen den neun Waldfragmenten war stark durch unterschiedliches Verhalten funktioneller Gruppen strukturiert. Besonders fruchtfressende Arten, Waldspezialisten und große Vögel zeigten eine hohe Ausbreitungsfähigkeit in der fragmentierten Landschaft. Die Nähe der Fragmente zueinander sowie deren gute Habitatqualität könnten die große Flexibilität auch spezialisierter Vogelarten erklären. Eine „fourth-corner“ Analyse zeigte dennoch, dass fruchtfressende Arten, Waldspezialisten und große Vögel eine starke Affinität zu natürlichen Fragmenten, geschlossenem Kronendach und großen Fragmenten hatten. Nur ein kleiner Teil der Vogelgemeinschaft schien in den Fragmenten sesshaft zu sein. Besonders insektenfressende und generalistische Vogelarten bewohnten die Waldfragmente in Zuckerrohrfeldern. Meine Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Waldfragmente in heterogenen Landschaften zum einen als wichtige Trittsteine für mobile Arten, zum anderen aber auch als Rückzugsraum standorttreuer Arten fungieren. Somit können auch modifizierte Wälder zum Erhalt der regionalen Vogelvielfalt in vom Menschen geprägten Landschaften beitragen. Zusammenfassend lässt sich feststellen, dass modifizierte Wälder durchaus zum Erhalt von Artenvielfalt und ökosystemarer Funktionalität in heterogenen Landschaften beitragen. Vor dem Hintergrund der weltweiten Zunahme anthropogener Einflüsse auf Wälder, ist besonders aus naturschutzfachlicher Sicht ein hohes Potential modifizierter Wälder Grund zur Ermutigung. Vor allem modifizierte Wälder in räumlicher Nähe zu Schutzgebieten sollten hohe Schutzpriorität genießen, da sie als Pufferzonen für natürliche Wälder in anthropogen beeinflussten Landschaften fungieren können. Bei einer Verallgemeinerung der Ergebnisse ist jedoch Vorsicht geboten. Es zeigte sich, dass modifizierte Wälder den Verlust natürlicher Wälder nicht vollständig kompensierten. Eine hohe Sensitivität von Waldspezialisten und allgemeine Verschiebungen der Zusammensetzung von Artengemeinschaften in modifizierten Wäldern machten deutlich, dass natürliche Wälder essentiell für den Erhalt der Biodiversität sind. Eine zusätzliche Erklärung für die hohe Flexibilität der Artengemeinschaften gegenüber anthropogener Waldmodifikation kann die Geschichte der Untersuchungsregion liefern. Die Tatsache, dass Hangwälder schon durch die Orographie stets voneinander isoliert vorkamen, hat möglicherweise eine evolutionäre Anpassung der Arten hervorgebracht, die die Anfälligkeit der heutigen Flora und Fauna gegenüber Fragmentierung vermindert. Schließlich zeichneten sich die Waldfragmente durch eine gute Habitatqualität aus, die durch hohe Ressourcenverfügbarkeit, strukturelle Heterogenität und kurze Distanzen zwischen den Fragmenten zu einem hohen Artenreichtum beitrug. Folglich ist der Erhalt von strukturreichen Wäldern essentiell für den Schutz von Artenvielfalt und Ökosystemfunktionen in vom Menschen modifizierten Landschaften. urn:nbn:de:hebis:04-z2011-06525 2011-11-08 2011-12-19 2011 opus:4011 2011-12-21 Modified forests are vital for species communities and ecological functionality in a heterogeneous South African landscape Modified forests are vital for species communities and ecological functionality in a heterogeneous South African landscape Neuschulz, Eike Lena Neuschulz Eike Lena Philipps-Universität Marburg ths Prof. Dr. Farwig Nina Farwig, Nina (Prof. Dr.)
recordtype opus
id urn:nbn:de:hebis:04-z2011-0652
urn_str urn:nbn:de:hebis:04-z2011-06525
collection Monograph
uri_str http://archiv.ub.uni-marburg.de/diss/z2011/0652
callnumber-raw diss/z2011/0652
callnumber-search diss/z2011/0652
callnumber-sort diss/z2011/0652
callnumber-label diss z2011 0652
callnumber-first diss
callnumber-subject diss z2011
_version_ 1563293866049667072
score 9,62055