Arbeiten zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen

Nichtribosomal synthetisierte Peptide stellen eine breite Klasse von Naturstoffen dar und besitzen meist pharmakologisch nützliche Eigenschaften. Diese von Bakterien und Pilzen produzierten, niedermolekularen Peptidverbindungen enthalten meist modifizierte Reste, zum Teil Aryl- und Fettsäuren und s...

Ausführliche Beschreibung

Gespeichert in:
1. Verfasser: Samel, Stefan Andreas
Beteiligte: Essen, L.-O. (Prof. Dr.) (BetreuerIn (Doktorarbeit))
Format: Dissertation
Sprache:Deutsch
Veröffentlicht: Philipps-Universität Marburg 2009
Chemie
Schlagworte:
Online Zugang:PDF-Volltext
Tags: Tag hinzufügen
Keine Tags, Fügen Sie den ersten Tag hinzu!
topic Nonribosomal peptide synthesis
Thioesterasedomäne
Epimerization domain
Thioesterse domain
Nichtribosomale Peptidsynthese
NRPS
X-ray
Epimerisierungsdomäne
NRPS
Chemie
Proteinkristallographie
Condensation domain
Protein crystallography
Biochemie
Kondensatinsdomäne
spellingShingle Nonribosomal peptide synthesis
Thioesterasedomäne
Epimerization domain
Thioesterse domain
Nichtribosomale Peptidsynthese
NRPS
X-ray
Epimerisierungsdomäne
NRPS
Chemie
Proteinkristallographie
Condensation domain
Protein crystallography
Biochemie
Kondensatinsdomäne
Most bacteria and fungi produce secondary metabolites, including nonribosomally synthesized peptides, some of which possess potent pharmacological activities. These peptidic compounds comprise 3 to 15 ‘amino acids’ and often contain unusual building blocks such as aryl or fatty acids or non-proteinogenic amino acids, respectively. These modifications strongly add to their structural as well as functional diversity and are made possible by means of large enzymes or enzyme complexes, the so-called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). NRPS exhibit a modular organization with each module containing specific domains catalyzing the basic reactions required for peptide assembly. The goal of this work is the elucidation of protein structures of catalytic domains involved in nonribosomal peptide synthesis with the main focus being set on thioesterase domains, condensation domains as well as epimerization domains. Thioesterase domains catalyze the release of the enzyme-bound, full-length peptide and mostly the concomitant cyclization of the product. Condensation domains catalyze peptide bond formation between two aminoacyl intermediates or an aminoacyl and a peptidyl intermediate, respectively. Epimerization domains primarily alter the stereochemical configuration of amino acid residues in the enzyme-bound intermediates. In bacterial synthetase clusters, they are also involved in intermolecular interactions leading to mutual recognition of cognate synthetases. After the elucidation of the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the thioesterase domain involved in fengycin biosynthesis, a model of a putative enzyme-substrate complex was derived in silico using a combination of docking and molecular dynamics. The model suggests an edge-on binding mode of the peptide in the enzyme’s binding pocket. Finally the binding mode was tested biochemically through analysis of the enzyme’s acceptance towards altered substrates as well as by molecular dynamics simulations for stability of the complex. The 1.8 Å crystal structure of the PCP-C bidomain protein of the tyrocidin synthetase TycC from B. brevis was solved using multiple anomalous dispersion (MAD). This structure provides insight not only into the architecture of an internal condensation domain but also into the orientation and interactions of the linker connecting the two adjacent domains. The conformation of the PCP domain corresponds to the A/H-conformation. The condensation domain comprises two chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT)-like subdomains with its active site being located at the two subdomains‘ interface. Interactions between these two subdomains are mainly observed in two regions, the bridge region and the floor loop. The former bridges the active site, the latter forms the bottom of the domain’s active site and conributes to the active site’s structural integrity through an intricate network of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. The exact mechanism of the condensation reaction remains unknown. However, structure-based calculations contradict the model in which the active site histidine acts as a catalytic base. Lead by further analysis of the active site’s surroundings a new model for the catalytic mechanism is described. The structure of an NRPS-epimerization domain from the tyrocidin synthetase TycA from B. brevis was solved at 1.65 Å resolution and gives a first impression of the structural organization of these cofactor-independent epimerases. Due to their evolutionary relatedness to condensation domains they also consist of two CAT-like subdomains. Direct comparison of condensation and epimerization domains indicates profound differences in their active sites, their bridge regions and their floor loops. In addition to the conserved, catalytically active histidine residue, H146, the active site of the epimerization domain contains a likewise conserved glutamate residue, E285. As for the condensation domain, calculations regarding the protonation states result in a protonated H146, thus precluding a role as a catalytic base as described in earlier models. While the detailed mechanism remains unknown, the epimerization domain is compared to structurally and functionally similar enzymes in order to improve our understanding of the epimerization mechanism.
Arbeiten zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen
Samel, Stefan Andreas
url http://archiv.ub.uni-marburg.de/diss/z2010/0083/pdf/dsas.pdf
publishDate 2009
era_facet 2009
first_indexed 2010-03-15T00:00:00Z
building Fachbereich Chemie
contents Most bacteria and fungi produce secondary metabolites, including nonribosomally synthesized peptides, some of which possess potent pharmacological activities. These peptidic compounds comprise 3 to 15 ‘amino acids’ and often contain unusual building blocks such as aryl or fatty acids or non-proteinogenic amino acids, respectively. These modifications strongly add to their structural as well as functional diversity and are made possible by means of large enzymes or enzyme complexes, the so-called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). NRPS exhibit a modular organization with each module containing specific domains catalyzing the basic reactions required for peptide assembly. The goal of this work is the elucidation of protein structures of catalytic domains involved in nonribosomal peptide synthesis with the main focus being set on thioesterase domains, condensation domains as well as epimerization domains. Thioesterase domains catalyze the release of the enzyme-bound, full-length peptide and mostly the concomitant cyclization of the product. Condensation domains catalyze peptide bond formation between two aminoacyl intermediates or an aminoacyl and a peptidyl intermediate, respectively. Epimerization domains primarily alter the stereochemical configuration of amino acid residues in the enzyme-bound intermediates. In bacterial synthetase clusters, they are also involved in intermolecular interactions leading to mutual recognition of cognate synthetases. After the elucidation of the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the thioesterase domain involved in fengycin biosynthesis, a model of a putative enzyme-substrate complex was derived in silico using a combination of docking and molecular dynamics. The model suggests an edge-on binding mode of the peptide in the enzyme’s binding pocket. Finally the binding mode was tested biochemically through analysis of the enzyme’s acceptance towards altered substrates as well as by molecular dynamics simulations for stability of the complex. The 1.8 Å crystal structure of the PCP-C bidomain protein of the tyrocidin synthetase TycC from B. brevis was solved using multiple anomalous dispersion (MAD). This structure provides insight not only into the architecture of an internal condensation domain but also into the orientation and interactions of the linker connecting the two adjacent domains. The conformation of the PCP domain corresponds to the A/H-conformation. The condensation domain comprises two chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT)-like subdomains with its active site being located at the two subdomains‘ interface. Interactions between these two subdomains are mainly observed in two regions, the bridge region and the floor loop. The former bridges the active site, the latter forms the bottom of the domain’s active site and conributes to the active site’s structural integrity through an intricate network of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. The exact mechanism of the condensation reaction remains unknown. However, structure-based calculations contradict the model in which the active site histidine acts as a catalytic base. Lead by further analysis of the active site’s surroundings a new model for the catalytic mechanism is described. The structure of an NRPS-epimerization domain from the tyrocidin synthetase TycA from B. brevis was solved at 1.65 Å resolution and gives a first impression of the structural organization of these cofactor-independent epimerases. Due to their evolutionary relatedness to condensation domains they also consist of two CAT-like subdomains. Direct comparison of condensation and epimerization domains indicates profound differences in their active sites, their bridge regions and their floor loops. In addition to the conserved, catalytically active histidine residue, H146, the active site of the epimerization domain contains a likewise conserved glutamate residue, E285. As for the condensation domain, calculations regarding the protonation states result in a protonated H146, thus precluding a role as a catalytic base as described in earlier models. While the detailed mechanism remains unknown, the epimerization domain is compared to structurally and functionally similar enzymes in order to improve our understanding of the epimerization mechanism.
author2 Essen, L.-O. (Prof. Dr.)
author2_role ths
title Arbeiten zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen
title_short Arbeiten zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen
title_full Arbeiten zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen
title_fullStr Arbeiten zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen
title_full_unstemmed Arbeiten zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen
title_sort Arbeiten zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen
last_indexed 2011-08-10T23:59:59Z
oai_set_str_mv ddc:540
doc-type:doctoralThesis
open_access
xMetaDissPlus
dewey-raw 540
dewey-search 540
genre Chemistry and allied sciences
genre_facet Chemistry and allied sciences
topic_facet Chemie
ref_str_mv references
title_alt Structural characterization of thioesterase, condensation and epimerization domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases
format Dissertation
publisher Philipps-Universität Marburg
author Samel, Stefan Andreas
language German
license_str http://archiv.ub.uni-marburg.de/adm/urhg.html
institution Chemie
description Nichtribosomal synthetisierte Peptide stellen eine breite Klasse von Naturstoffen dar und besitzen meist pharmakologisch nützliche Eigenschaften. Diese von Bakterien und Pilzen produzierten, niedermolekularen Peptidverbindungen enthalten meist modifizierte Reste, zum Teil Aryl- und Fettsäuren und sind häufig makrozyklisiert. Die strukturelle Vielfalt wird durch die Ribosomenunabhängige Synthese an großen Enzymen bzw. Enzymkomplexen, den Nichtribosomalen Peptidsynthetasen (NRPS), möglich. Sie sind ähnlich den Typ I Fettsäuresynthasen modular aufgebaut, wobei definierte Domänen die erforderlichen Reaktionen katalysieren. Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der strukturellen Aufklärung der Domänenstrukturen von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen. Thioesterasedomänen liegen meist am Ende eines Syntheseclusters und katalysieren die Produktabspaltung. Dies geschieht häufig unter Makrozyklisierung des Produktpeptids. Kondensationsdomänen hingegen katalysieren die Ausbildung von Peptidbindungen in den Peptidprodukten. Epimerisierungsdomänen epimerisieren Aminosäurereste in den enzymgebundenen Intermediaten. In Synthetaseclustern sind sie darüber hinaus an den intramolekularen Wechselwirkungen zur gegenseitigen Erkennung aufeinanderfolgender Synthetasen beteiligt. Für die Thioesterase des Fengycin Syntheseclusters aus B. subtilis wurde durch Lösung ihrer Struktur bei 1.8 Å Auflösung und mit Hilfe computergestützter Methoden ein Strukturmodell eines Enzym-Produkt-Komplexes entwickelt. In diesem Komplex ist das Produkt edge-on in einer grabenförmigen Vertiefung der Proteinoberfläche gebunden. Die Stabilität des Komplexes konnte mit Hilfe einer Moleküldynamik-Simulation über einen Zeitraum von 10 ns gezeigt werden. Anschließend durchgeführte Enzymaktivitätstests unter Verwendung gezielt veränderter Substratpeptide unterstützen das Modell des Enzym-Produkt-Komplexes. Die 1.8 Å Struktur eines PCP-C Bidomänenproteins aus der Tyrocidin Synthetase TycC aus B. brevis wurde mittels multipler, anomaler Dispersion (MAD) gelöst. Sie liefert Einblick sowohl in die Struktur einer internen Kondensationsdomäne als auch in die Lage des Domänenverbindenden Linkers. Die beobachtete Konformation der Peptidyl Carrier Protein-Domäne entspricht der A/H-Konformation. Die Kondensationsdomäne besteht aus zwei Subdomänen, die jeweils Ähnlichkeit zum Chloramphenicol-Acetyltransferase (CAT)-Faltungstyp aufweisen. An der Grenzfläche der Subdomänen liegen sowohl das katalytische Zentrum als auch zwei Bereiche, über die die beiden Subdomänen miteinander interagieren. Dies sind zum einen die bridge region, die das aktive Zentrum überbrückt, zum anderen der floor loop, der den Boden des aktiven Zentrums bildet und dessen Wechselwirkungen zur strukturellen Integrität des aktiven Zentrums beitragen. Der Mechanismus der Kondensationsreaktion ist noch nicht vollständig geklärt. Strukturbasierte Berechnungen deuten darauf hin, dass, entgegen der bisherigen Modellvorstellung, der Histidinrest im aktiven Zentrum nicht als katalytische Base agiert. Auf Basis weiterer in der Kristallstruktur beobachteter Wechselwirkungen wird ein neues Modell für die Katalyse der Peptidbindungsbildung in Kondensationsdomänen vorgeschlagen. Die strukturelle Charakterisierung der NRPS-Epimerisierungsdomäne der Tyrocidin Synthetase TycA aus B. brevis bei 1.65 Å Auflösung gibt erstmals Einblicke in die räumliche Organisation dieser Kofaktor-unabhängigen Epimerasen. Bedingt durch die Verwandtschaft mit den Kondensationsdomänen bestehen die Epimerisierungsdomänen ebenfalls aus zwei CAT-ähnlichen Subdomänen. Ein Vergleich mit der oben beschriebenen Kondensationsdomäne zeigt auch deutliche Unterschiede im Bereich der bridge region, des floor loops sowie im aktiven Zentrum. Die Epimerisierungsdomäne enthält in ihrem aktiven Zentrum neben einem konservierten, katalytisch aktiven Histidinrest, H146, ebenfalls einen konservierten Glutamatrest, E285. Auch für die Epimerisierungsdomäne ergeben die Berechnungen der Protonierungszustände, dass H146 protoniert vorliegt. Dies widerspricht den bisherigen Modellvorstellungen, wonach H146 als katalytische Base auftritt. Während der Mechanismus ungeklärt bleibt, wird die Epimerisierungsdomäne mit strukturell und funktionell ähnlichen Proteinen verglichen, um Hinweise auf den Katalysemechanismus zu erhalten.
thumbnail http://archiv.ub.uni-marburg.de/diss/z2010/0083/cover.png
spelling diss/z2010/0083 2009 2010-03-15 opus:2482 Most bacteria and fungi produce secondary metabolites, including nonribosomally synthesized peptides, some of which possess potent pharmacological activities. These peptidic compounds comprise 3 to 15 ‘amino acids’ and often contain unusual building blocks such as aryl or fatty acids or non-proteinogenic amino acids, respectively. These modifications strongly add to their structural as well as functional diversity and are made possible by means of large enzymes or enzyme complexes, the so-called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). NRPS exhibit a modular organization with each module containing specific domains catalyzing the basic reactions required for peptide assembly. The goal of this work is the elucidation of protein structures of catalytic domains involved in nonribosomal peptide synthesis with the main focus being set on thioesterase domains, condensation domains as well as epimerization domains. Thioesterase domains catalyze the release of the enzyme-bound, full-length peptide and mostly the concomitant cyclization of the product. Condensation domains catalyze peptide bond formation between two aminoacyl intermediates or an aminoacyl and a peptidyl intermediate, respectively. Epimerization domains primarily alter the stereochemical configuration of amino acid residues in the enzyme-bound intermediates. In bacterial synthetase clusters, they are also involved in intermolecular interactions leading to mutual recognition of cognate synthetases. After the elucidation of the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the thioesterase domain involved in fengycin biosynthesis, a model of a putative enzyme-substrate complex was derived in silico using a combination of docking and molecular dynamics. The model suggests an edge-on binding mode of the peptide in the enzyme’s binding pocket. Finally the binding mode was tested biochemically through analysis of the enzyme’s acceptance towards altered substrates as well as by molecular dynamics simulations for stability of the complex. The 1.8 Å crystal structure of the PCP-C bidomain protein of the tyrocidin synthetase TycC from B. brevis was solved using multiple anomalous dispersion (MAD). This structure provides insight not only into the architecture of an internal condensation domain but also into the orientation and interactions of the linker connecting the two adjacent domains. The conformation of the PCP domain corresponds to the A/H-conformation. The condensation domain comprises two chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT)-like subdomains with its active site being located at the two subdomains‘ interface. Interactions between these two subdomains are mainly observed in two regions, the bridge region and the floor loop. The former bridges the active site, the latter forms the bottom of the domain’s active site and conributes to the active site’s structural integrity through an intricate network of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. The exact mechanism of the condensation reaction remains unknown. However, structure-based calculations contradict the model in which the active site histidine acts as a catalytic base. Lead by further analysis of the active site’s surroundings a new model for the catalytic mechanism is described. The structure of an NRPS-epimerization domain from the tyrocidin synthetase TycA from B. brevis was solved at 1.65 Å resolution and gives a first impression of the structural organization of these cofactor-independent epimerases. Due to their evolutionary relatedness to condensation domains they also consist of two CAT-like subdomains. Direct comparison of condensation and epimerization domains indicates profound differences in their active sites, their bridge regions and their floor loops. In addition to the conserved, catalytically active histidine residue, H146, the active site of the epimerization domain contains a likewise conserved glutamate residue, E285. As for the condensation domain, calculations regarding the protonation states result in a protonated H146, thus precluding a role as a catalytic base as described in earlier models. While the detailed mechanism remains unknown, the epimerization domain is compared to structurally and functionally similar enzymes in order to improve our understanding of the epimerization mechanism. Arbeiten zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen 2009-08-31 2011-08-10 Tanovic, A., Samel, S.A., Essen, L.O. and Marahiel, M.A. (2008) Crystal structure of the termination module of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Science, 321, 659-663. 2008 Crystal structure of the termination module of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase Stein, D.B., Linne, U., Hahn, M. and Marahiel, M.A. (2006) Impact of Epimerization Domains on the Intermodular Transfer of Enzyme-Bound Intermediates in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthesis. Chembiochem, 7, 1807-1814. 2006 Impact of Epimerization Domains on the Intermodular Transfer of Enzyme-Bound Intermediates in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthesis Yang, Z.R., Thomson, R., McNeil, P. and Esnouf, R.M. (2005) RONN: the bio-basis function neural network technique applied to the detection of natively disordered regions in proteins. Bioinformatics, 21, 3369-3376. 2005 RONN: the bio-basis function neural network technique applied to the detection of natively disordered regions in proteins Schwede, T., Kopp, J., Guex, N. and Peitsch, M.C. (2003) SWISS-MODEL: an automated protein homology-modeling server. Nucleic Acids Res, 31, 3381-3385. 2003 SWISS-MODEL: an automated protein homology-modeling server Wang, Y., Addess, K.J., Chen, J., Geer, L.Y., He, J., He, S., Lu, S., Madej, T., Marchler- Bauer, A., Thiessen, P.A., Zhang, N. and Bryant, S.H. (2007) MMDB: annotating protein sequences with Entrez's 3D-structure database. Nucleic Acids Res, 35, D298-300. 2007 MMDB: annotating protein sequences with Entrez's 3D-structure database Stein, T., Vater, J., Kruft, V., Otto, A., Wittmann-Liebold, B., Franke, P., Panico, M., McDowell, R. and Morris, H.R. (1996) The multiple carrier model of nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis at modular multienzymatic templates. J Biol Chem, 271, 15428-15435. 1996 The multiple carrier model of nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis at modular multienzymatic templates Schmeing, T.M., Huang, K.S., Strobel, S.A. and Steitz, T.A. (2005) An induced-fit mechanism to promote peptide bond formation and exclude hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNA. Nature, 438, 520- 524. 2005 An induced-fit mechanism to promote peptide bond formation and exclude hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNA Van Duyne, G.D., Standaert, R.F., Karplus, P.A., Schreiber, S.L. and Clardy, J. (1993) Atomic structures of the human immunophilin FKBP-12 complexes with FK506 and rapamycin. J Mol Biol, 229, 105-124. 1993 Atomic structures of the human immunophilin FKBP-12 complexes with FK506 and rapamycin Abbildung 8.2: Erzeugung von Struktur-Suchmodellen mit unterschiedlichen Subdomänenanordnungen Die Abbildung zeigt jeweils die N-terminale Subdomäne der auf die C-terminale Subdomäne überlagerten Strukturen. (A) Unterschiedliche Orientierung der N-terminalen Subdomänen in den Strukturen von PCP-C, SrfA-C und VibH. Die Anordnung der Subdomänen in SrfA-C und VibH sind gegenüber PCP-C in entgegengesetzten Richtungen verdreht. (B) Überlagerung der drei N-terminalen Subdomänen in einem Bild. (C) In silico generierte, theoretische Zwischen- stufen von relativen Subdomänen-Anordnungen in NRPS-Kondensationsdomänen. Der Übersichtlichkeit halber sind insgesamt nur 7 Modelle abgebildet. Farbgebung der Modelle gemäß Farbverlauf-Legende. A) Unterschiedliche Orientierung der N-terminalen Subdomänen in den Strukturen von PCP-C, SrfA-C und VibH Berechnete Matthews-Koeffizienten für die Kristallform von TycB3-E Berechnete Matthews-Koeffizienten für die Kristallform von TycB3-E Tang, G.L., Cheng, Y.Q. and Shen, B. (2007) Chain initiation in the leinamycin-producing hybrid nonribosomal peptide/polyketide synthetase from Streptomyces atroolivaceus S-140. Discrete, monofunctional adenylation enzyme and peptidyl carrier protein that directly load D-alanine. J Biol Chem, 282, 20273-20282. 2007 Chain initiation in the leinamycin-producing hybrid nonribosomal peptide/polyketide synthetase from Streptomyces atroolivaceus S-140. Discrete, monofunctional adenylation enzyme and peptidyl carrier protein that directly load D-alanine Tseng, C.C., Bruner, S.D., Kohli, R.M., Marahiel, M.A., Walsh, C.T. and Sieber, S.A. (2002) Characterization of the surfactin synthetase C-terminal thioesterase domain as a cyclic depsipeptide synthase. Biochemistry, 41, 13350-13359. 2002 Characterization of the surfactin synthetase C-terminal thioesterase domain as a cyclic depsipeptide synthase Schönafinger, G. (2003) Charakterisierung von internen Kondensationsdomänen der nicht- ribosomalen Peptidsynthetase des Tyrocidins: Untersuchungen zur Akzeptanz von Substraten in cis und in trans. Fachbereich Chemie, Marburg: Philipps-Universität Marburg. 2003 Charakterisierung von internen Kondensationsdomänen der nichtribosomalen Peptidsynthetase des Tyrocidins: Untersuchungen zur Akzeptanz von Substraten in cis und in trans Thompson, J.D., Higgins, D.G. and Gibson, T.J. (1994) CLUSTAL W: improving the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence weighting, position-specific gap penalties and weight matrix choice. Nucleic Acids Res, 22, 4673-4680. 1994 CLUSTAL W: improving the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence weighting, position-specific gap penalties and weight matrix choice Größe der Einheitszelle, ist das Ergebnis nicht eindeutig. Der Bereich der möglichen Molekülanzahl reicht von 6 bis 12. Wie aus der Tabelle hervorgeht, ist es am wahrscheinlichsten, dass 9-10 Moleküle in der asymmetrischen Einheitszelle vorliegen. Der Bereich der möglichen Molekülanzahl reicht von 6 bis 12. Wie aus der Tabelle hervorgeht, ist es am wahrscheinlichsten Roche, E.D. and Walsh, C.T. (2003) Dissection of the EntF condensation domain boundary and active site residues in nonribosomal peptide synthesis. Biochemistry, 42, 1334-1344. 2003 Dissection of the EntF condensation domain boundary and active site residues in nonribosomal peptide synthesis Yeh, E., Lin, H., Clugston, S.L., Kohli, R.M. and Walsh, C.T. (2004) Enhanced macrocyclizing activity of the thioesterase from tyrocidine synthetase in presence of nonionic detergent. Chem Biol, 11, 1573-1582. 2004 Enhanced macrocyclizing activity of the thioesterase from tyrocidine synthetase in presence of nonionic detergent Vanittanakom, N., Loeffler, W., Koch, U. and Jung, G. (1986) Fengycin--a novel antifungal lipopeptide antibiotic produced by Bacillus subtilis F-29-3. J Antibiot (Tokyo), 39, 888-901. 1986 Fengycin--a novel antifungal lipopeptide antibiotic produced by Bacillus subtilis F-29-3 Sieber, S.A., Walsh, C.T. and Marahiel, M.A. (2003) Loading peptidyl-coenzyme A onto peptidyl carrier proteins: a novel approach in characterizing macrocyclization by thioesterase domains. J Am Chem Soc, 125, 10862-10866. 2003 Loading peptidyl-coenzyme A onto peptidyl carrier proteins: a novel approach in characterizing macrocyclization by thioesterase domains Sambrook, J., Fritsch, E.F. and Maniatis, T. (1989) Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY. 1989 Molecular Cloning Walsh, C. (2000) Molecular mechanisms that confer antibacterial drug resistance. Nature, 406, 775-781. 2000 Molecular mechanisms that confer antibacterial drug resistance Sieber, S.A. and Marahiel, M.A. (2005) Molecular mechanisms underlying nonribosomal peptide synthesis: Approaches to new antibiotics. Chem Rev, 105, 715-738. 2005 Molecular mechanisms underlying nonribosomal peptide synthesis: Approaches to new antibiotics Vagin, A. and Teplyakov, A. (1997) MOLREP: an Automated Program for Molecular Replacement. Journal of Applied Crystallography, 30, 1022-1025. 1997 MOLREP: an Automated Program for Molecular Replacement Stachelhaus, T. and Walsh, C.T. (2000) Mutational analysis of the epimerization domain in the initiation module PheATE of gramicidin S synthetase. Biochemistry, 39, 5775-5787. 2000 Mutational analysis of the epimerization domain in the initiation module PheATE of gramicidin S synthetase Volpon, L., Besson, F. and Lancelin, J.-M. (2000) NMR structure of antibiotics plipastatins A and B from Bacillus subtilis inhibitors of phospholipase A 2 . FEBS Lett, 485, 76-80. 2000 NMR structure of antibiotics plipastatins A and B from Bacillus subtilis inhibitors of phospholipase A 2 Stachelhaus, T., Mootz, H.D., Bergendahl, V. and Marahiel, M.A. (1998) Peptide bond formation in nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis. J Biol Chem, 273, 22773-22781. 1998 Peptide bond formation in nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis Trauger, J.W., Kohli, R.M., Mootz, H.D., Marahiel, M.A. and Walsh, C.T. (2000) Peptide cyclization catalysed by the thioesterase domain of tyrocidine synthetase. Nature, 407, 215-218. 2000 Peptide cyclization catalysed by the thioesterase domain of tyrocidine synthetase Sieber, S.A., Tao, J., Walsh, C.T. and Marahiel, M.A. (2004) Peptidyl thiophenols as substrates for nonribosomal peptide cyclases. Angew Chem Int Ed Engl, 43, 493-498. 2004 Peptidyl thiophenols as substrates for nonribosomal peptide cyclases Takeuchi, T. (1986) Plipastatins: new inhibitors of phospholipase A2, produced by Bacillus cereus BMG302-fF67. I. Taxonomy, production, isolation and preliminary characterization. J Antibiot (Tokyo), 39, 737-744. 1986 Plipastatins: new inhibitors of phospholipase A2, produced by Bacillus cereus BMG302-fF67. I. Taxonomy, production, isolation and preliminary characterization Sigma Basic Kit for Protein Crystallization 132 Sigma Basic Kit for Protein Crystallization 132 Sigma Extension Kit for Protein Crystallization 133 Sigma Extension Kit for Protein Crystallization 133 Weber, T., Baumgartner, R., Renner, C., Marahiel, M.A. and Holak, T.A. (2000) Solution structure of PCP, a prototype for the peptidyl carrier domains of modular peptide synthetases. Structure Fold. Des., 8, 407-418. 2000 Solution structure of PCP, a prototype for the peptidyl carrier domains of modular peptide synthetases Wagner, B., Sieber, S.A., Baumann, M. and Marahiel, M.A. (2006) Solvent engineering substantially enhances the chemoenzymatic production of surfactin. Chembiochem, 7, 595-597. 2006 Solvent engineering substantially enhances the chemoenzymatic production of surfactin Samel, S.A., Schoenafinger, G., Knappe, T.A., Marahiel, M.A. and Essen, L.O. (2007) Structural and functional insights into a peptide bond-forming bidomain from a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Structure, 15, 781-792. 2007 Structural and functional insights into a peptide bond-forming bidomain from a nonribosomal peptide synthetase Weber, G., Schorgendorfer, K., Schneider-Scherzer, E. and Leitner, E. (1994) The peptide synthetase catalyzing cyclosporine production in Tolypocladium niveum is encoded by a giant 45.8-kilobase open reading frame. Curr Genet, 26, 120-125. 1994 The peptide synthetase catalyzing cyclosporine production in Tolypocladium niveum is encoded by a giant 45.8-kilobase open reading frame Tanner, M.E. (2002) Understanding nature's strategies for enzyme-catalyzed racemization and epimerization. Acc Chem Res, 35, 237-246. 2002 Understanding nature's strategies for enzyme-catalyzed racemization and epimerization Samel, S.A. (2004) Untersuchungen zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterasedomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen. Fachbereich Chemie, Marburg: Philipps-Universität Marburg. 2004 Untersuchungen zur strukturellen Charakterisierung von Thioesterasedomänen nichtribosomaler Peptidsynthetasen Stein, D.B., Linne, U. and Marahiel, M.A. (2005) Utility of epimerization domains for the redesign of nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Febs J, 272, 4506-4520. 2005 Utility of epimerization domains for the redesign of nonribosomal peptide synthetases Sheldrick, G.M. (2002) Macromolecular phasing with SHELXE. Zeitschrift für Kristallographie, 217, 644-650. 2002 Macromolecular phasing with SHELXE Vock, P., Engst, S., Eder, M. and Ghisla, S. (1998) Substrate activation by acyl-CoA dehydrogenases: transition-state stabilization and pKs of involved functional groups. Biochemistry, 37, 1848-1860. 1998 Substrate activation by acyl-CoA dehydrogenases: transition-state stabilization and pKs of involved functional groups Schneider, T.R. and Sheldrick, G.M. (2002) Substructure solution with SHELXD. Acta Crystallogr D Biol Crystallogr, 58, 1772-1779. 2002 Substructure solution with SHELXD Rausch, C., Hoof, I., Weber, T., Wohlleben, W. and Huson, D.H. (2007) Phylogenetic analysis of condensation domains in NRPS sheds light on their functional evolution. BMC Evol Biol, 7, 78. 2007 Phylogenetic analysis of condensation domains in NRPS sheds light on their functional evolution Tang, Y., Kim, C.-Y., Mathews, I.I., Cane, D.E. and Khosla, C. (2006) The 2.7 Å crystal structure of a 194-kDa homodimeric fragment of the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 103, 11124-11129. 2006 The 2.7 Å crystal structure of a 194-kDa homodimeric fragment of the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase Smith, S. and Tsai, S.C. (2007) The type I fatty acid and polyketide synthases: a tale of two megasynthases. Nat Prod Rep, 24, 1041-1072. 123 2007 The type I fatty acid and polyketide synthases: a tale of two megasynthases Stachelhaus, T., Mootz, H.D. and Marahiel, M.A. (1999) The specificity-conferring code of adenylation domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Chem Biol, 6, 493-505. 1999 The specificity-conferring code of adenylation domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases Structural characterization of thioesterase, condensation and epimerization domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases urn:nbn:de:hebis:04-z2010-00832 Nichtribosomal synthetisierte Peptide stellen eine breite Klasse von Naturstoffen dar und besitzen meist pharmakologisch nützliche Eigenschaften. Diese von Bakterien und Pilzen produzierten, niedermolekularen Peptidverbindungen enthalten meist modifizierte Reste, zum Teil Aryl- und Fettsäuren und sind häufig makrozyklisiert. Die strukturelle Vielfalt wird durch die Ribosomenunabhängige Synthese an großen Enzymen bzw. Enzymkomplexen, den Nichtribosomalen Peptidsynthetasen (NRPS), möglich. Sie sind ähnlich den Typ I Fettsäuresynthasen modular aufgebaut, wobei definierte Domänen die erforderlichen Reaktionen katalysieren. Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der strukturellen Aufklärung der Domänenstrukturen von Thioesterase-, Kondensations- und Epimerisierungsdomänen. Thioesterasedomänen liegen meist am Ende eines Syntheseclusters und katalysieren die Produktabspaltung. Dies geschieht häufig unter Makrozyklisierung des Produktpeptids. Kondensationsdomänen hingegen katalysieren die Ausbildung von Peptidbindungen in den Peptidprodukten. Epimerisierungsdomänen epimerisieren Aminosäurereste in den enzymgebundenen Intermediaten. In Synthetaseclustern sind sie darüber hinaus an den intramolekularen Wechselwirkungen zur gegenseitigen Erkennung aufeinanderfolgender Synthetasen beteiligt. Für die Thioesterase des Fengycin Syntheseclusters aus B. subtilis wurde durch Lösung ihrer Struktur bei 1.8 Å Auflösung und mit Hilfe computergestützter Methoden ein Strukturmodell eines Enzym-Produkt-Komplexes entwickelt. In diesem Komplex ist das Produkt edge-on in einer grabenförmigen Vertiefung der Proteinoberfläche gebunden. Die Stabilität des Komplexes konnte mit Hilfe einer Moleküldynamik-Simulation über einen Zeitraum von 10 ns gezeigt werden. Anschließend durchgeführte Enzymaktivitätstests unter Verwendung gezielt veränderter Substratpeptide unterstützen das Modell des Enzym-Produkt-Komplexes. Die 1.8 Å Struktur eines PCP-C Bidomänenproteins aus der Tyrocidin Synthetase TycC aus B. brevis wurde mittels multipler, anomaler Dispersion (MAD) gelöst. Sie liefert Einblick sowohl in die Struktur einer internen Kondensationsdomäne als auch in die Lage des Domänenverbindenden Linkers. Die beobachtete Konformation der Peptidyl Carrier Protein-Domäne entspricht der A/H-Konformation. Die Kondensationsdomäne besteht aus zwei Subdomänen, die jeweils Ähnlichkeit zum Chloramphenicol-Acetyltransferase (CAT)-Faltungstyp aufweisen. An der Grenzfläche der Subdomänen liegen sowohl das katalytische Zentrum als auch zwei Bereiche, über die die beiden Subdomänen miteinander interagieren. Dies sind zum einen die bridge region, die das aktive Zentrum überbrückt, zum anderen der floor loop, der den Boden des aktiven Zentrums bildet und dessen Wechselwirkungen zur strukturellen Integrität des aktiven Zentrums beitragen. Der Mechanismus der Kondensationsreaktion ist noch nicht vollständig geklärt. Strukturbasierte Berechnungen deuten darauf hin, dass, entgegen der bisherigen Modellvorstellung, der Histidinrest im aktiven Zentrum nicht als katalytische Base agiert. Auf Basis weiterer in der Kristallstruktur beobachteter Wechselwirkungen wird ein neues Modell für die Katalyse der Peptidbindungsbildung in Kondensationsdomänen vorgeschlagen. Die strukturelle Charakterisierung der NRPS-Epimerisierungsdomäne der Tyrocidin Synthetase TycA aus B. brevis bei 1.65 Å Auflösung gibt erstmals Einblicke in die räumliche Organisation dieser Kofaktor-unabhängigen Epimerasen. Bedingt durch die Verwandtschaft mit den Kondensationsdomänen bestehen die Epimerisierungsdomänen ebenfalls aus zwei CAT-ähnlichen Subdomänen. Ein Vergleich mit der oben beschriebenen Kondensationsdomäne zeigt auch deutliche Unterschiede im Bereich der bridge region, des floor loops sowie im aktiven Zentrum. Die Epimerisierungsdomäne enthält in ihrem aktiven Zentrum neben einem konservierten, katalytisch aktiven Histidinrest, H146, ebenfalls einen konservierten Glutamatrest, E285. Auch für die Epimerisierungsdomäne ergeben die Berechnungen der Protonierungszustände, dass H146 protoniert vorliegt. Dies widerspricht den bisherigen Modellvorstellungen, wonach H146 als katalytische Base auftritt. Während der Mechanismus ungeklärt bleibt, wird die Epimerisierungsdomäne mit strukturell und funktionell ähnlichen Proteinen verglichen, um Hinweise auf den Katalysemechanismus zu erhalten. ths Prof. Dr. Essen L.-O. Essen, L.-O. (Prof. Dr.) Philipps-Universität Marburg Samel, Stefan Andreas Samel Stefan Andreas
recordtype opus
id urn:nbn:de:hebis:04-z2010-0083
urn_str urn:nbn:de:hebis:04-z2010-00832
collection Monograph
uri_str http://archiv.ub.uni-marburg.de/diss/z2010/0083
callnumber-raw diss/z2010/0083
callnumber-search diss/z2010/0083
callnumber-sort diss/z2010/0083
callnumber-label diss z2010 0083
callnumber-first diss
callnumber-subject diss z2010
_version_ 1563293777398857728
score 9,617626